Category Archives: Hula Hoop Fitness

I Can’t Do It Alone – Cara Zara Hula Hoop Performance at Romare Bearden Park

Yours truly performing at Romare Bearden Park Saturday May 7th at 2pm. But I, Cara Zara, “Can’t Do It Alone.” You definitely won’t want to miss my final “act of desperation” for Romare Jazz Fest. Free fun for the family: magic, face painting, balloon artists, caricatures, and of course Hula-Hoops 🙂

Romare Fest Cara Zara

 

“We Got To Have Peace”

This post is dedicated to my children and children all around the world. “People please hear us (people please hear us), through our voice the world knows there’s no choice. We’re begging save the children. The little ones who just don’t understand. Give them a chance to breed their young and help purify the land.” Thank you Curtis Mayfield!

We got have peace
To keep the world alive
And war to cease.

We got to have joy,
True in our hearts
With strength we can’t destroy.

People please hear us (people please hear us)
Through our voice the world knows
There’s no choice.

We’re begging save the children
The little ones
Who just don’t understand

Give them a chance
To breed their young
And help purify the land

People please hear us (people please hear us)
Through our voice the world knows
There’s no choice.

And the people in the neighbourhood,
Who would if they only could,
Meet and shake the other’s hand,
Work together for the good of the land.

Give us all an equal chance,
It could be such a sweet romance.
And the soldiers who are dead and gone,
If only we could bring back one,

He’d say “We’ve got to have peace”
To keep the world alive
And war to cease

We got to have joy
Ture in our hearts
With strength we can’t destroy

People please hear us (people please hear us)
Through our voice the world knows
There’s no choice

And the people in the neighbourhood
Who would if they only could
Meet and shake the other’s hand
Work together for the good of the land

Give us all an equal chance
It could be such a sweet romance
And the soldiers who are dead and gone
If only we could bring back one

He’d say “We’ve got to have peace”
Aah – hah, we got to have peace
Let Let the world know it

Peace, peace, peace
Aah – hah, we got to have peace

People please hear us (people please hear us)
Through our voice the world knows
There’s no choice

Save the children

Save the children

Save the children

And the people in the neighbourhood
Who would if they only could
Meet and shake the other’s hand
Work together for the good of the land

Give us all an equal chance
It could be such a sweet romance
And the soldiers who are dead and gone
If only we could bring back one

He’d say “We’ve got to have peace”
Lo – rd, we got to have peace

Let the people say it

Peace peace peace
Aah – hah, we got to have peace

20 Girls in Their 20s Open Up About How They Were Bullied — And How They Overcame It

Girl-Bullying

For many of us, it’s the silence of being friendless and alone that causes us pain. That silence can be just as loud as a group of kids teasing you in the cafeteria. Getting attention for the wrong thing can be just as horrible as being left out. However you are bullied, actively or passively, you feel less than, like your existence doesn’t matter, like you should just roll over and die already. Some of us have the tendency to take it out on other people. Sports teams, sororities, and fraternities have traditions of hazing because “we’ve all been through it” and “it makes you stronger.” But that’s missing the point. My favorite life lesson: if someone is yelling at you, it’s because someone else is yelling at them. Don’t become another bully, be the hero who breaks the cycle. Once you stand up for yourself, it gets easier every time.

Visit Teen Vogue for 20 personal stories about bullying. (Post is an excerpt from Teen Vogue article) 20 Girls in Their 20s Open Up About How They Were Bullied — And How They Overcame It:  by 

 

Karma in Action

Simple and powerful video. May we all be kind to one another in 2016. Happy New Year! Cara Zara

How Childhood Trauma Could Be Mistaken for ADHD

Some experts say the normal effects of severe adversity may be misdiagnosed as ADHD. Inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive behavior may mirror the effects of adversity, and many doctors don’t know how—or don’t have time—to tell the difference.

adhd-kids

When speaking to traumatized children inappropriately diagnosed with ADHD, Dr. Heather Forkey, a pediatrician at University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center, offers them a reassuring explanation of their behavior. The body’s stress system, she says, developed long ago in response to life-or-death threats like a predatory tiger. The part of the brain that controls impulses, for example, shuts off so that survival instincts can prevail.

“What does that look like when you put that kid in a classroom?” Forkey asks. “When people don’t understand there’s been a tiger in your life, it looks a lot like ADHD to them.”

Forkey’s goal is to remind doctors that inattentive and hyperactive behavior can be traced back to any number of conditions—just like chest pains don’t have the same origin in every patient. Ideally, the AAP will offer pediatricians recommendations for screening tools that efficiently gauge adversity in a child’s life. That practice, she says, should come before any diagnosis of ADHD.

While there are few recommendations now for clinicians, that will likely change in the coming years. The American Academy of Pediatrics is currently developing new guidance on ADHD that will include a section on assessing trauma in patients, though it won’t be completed until 2016.

Excerpt from: The Atlantic article – “How Childhood Trauma Could Be Mistaken for ADHD”

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/07/how-childhood-trauma-could-be-mistaken-for-adhd/373328/